Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Cinderella's Wedding Shoes - SRE


Another of Julie's Creations
( From the Pam Cox Collection )

Julie has adorned these shoes beautifully, and given us
a reminder of where Silk Ribbon Embroidery
originated.
Let your mind drift back to the days of the 17th. Century when
the aristocracy adorned their clothes with Silk Ribbon Embroidery.

Embellished with Ribbon Stitch, Gathered Rosettes and Loop Flowers.




Be sure and come back to visit for my next Tutorial
which will be on Delphiniums.

Have a Nice Day.

Carol Daisy

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Tutorial - Snowdrops in Silk Ribbon Embroidery

SNOWDROPS IN SILK RIBBON 





Celebrated as a sign of spring, 
snowdrops can form impressive carpets of white.

Step 1:  Form the base of the bulb with stem stitch
as shown, allowing a few branches to base the 
flower heads.
I have used 2 threads of a deep green.




Step 2:  Create the flowers with downward
Ribbon Stitches in groups of 2 or 3
depending on how full you require each one.

Step 3:  Cover the tips of the flowers with
2 tiny ribbon stitches in a matching
green to the larger ribbon for the leaves.
Make sure you are hiding the area where 
the stem and flowers touch.
Note: Place a finger over the white ribbon
stitches as you are executing the green
to prevent it from pulling the flower stitches
as the needle is pulled through.






Step 4:   Add large base leaves in 7 mm Silk
Ribbon. For the longer ones you may need
to add a holding stitch in thread to hold in place.

Step 5: Using a single thread of the cotton
add small french knots at the point of the
flower.








Carol Daisy

Saturday, October 24, 2009

Crazy Patch Embellishing




EMBELLISHING WITH SRE











 



I have added Ribbon Stitch Flowers in 7 mm
Mauve Ribbon with blue seed beads and 7 mm
Green Ribbon Stitch Leaves to a Lace trim.
A gold bee charm sits on top.


A little difficult getting the ribbon to got through
all the layers, but if you have a needle grabber
or other gripping pad, it will help.

It certainly is worth the trouble as you get another
dimension to your work.








Julie Thornton's Drawstring Bag

Velvet covered with hand painted synthetic material, with silk lining.
Pieced and machine embroidered. I love the combination of Hot Pink 
and Orange in this.





Carol Daisy

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Leaves in Silk Ribbon Embroidery












 
Leaves an essential in SRE Embroidery.
There are many ways to create leaves.
These are just a few of the ones I have done.





















Detached chain leaves with Stem Stitch.
The length of the tip is decided by where you
take the needle back through.


Detached Chain with a Bullion Wrap

Gives a more pointed leaf.



















Bring ribbon through and take the needle back in
at the entry point and out again as shown.





















Make sure the ribbon is flat. Make 1 or more wraps
around the needle.
 
Hold knots firm with a finger as you pull the ribbon
through. Take needle back through the fabric at the
tip.




















Can also be used for flower petals such as Poinsietta
or Australian Flannel Flower. Any flower that has
a pronounced point.





Ribbon Stitch.
Use the stitches to form the shape of the Leaf.











Ribbon Stitch in Organza Ribbon.
Use thread to show the veins in
the leaf.
Great for adding to Larger Folded
Ribbon Roses.















This should give you a wider variety
once added to the stitches already
shown in the previous tutorials.


The other option is stitching
in Embroidery Thread, we can delve into
this at a later date.


Carol Daisy

Sunday, October 18, 2009

Wearable Art by Julie Thornton

















MASQUERADE
( Constructed Mask and Dress of Silk, Polyester, Velvet and Lace,
Metallic Thread and Beads, pieced and appliqued and free
machine-embroidered for the Sydney Art to Wear Exhibition. )


These are photos of Wearable Art exhibited by Julie Thornton
a textile artist based in Rockhampton. Julie has received National
and International recognition for her garments. The exhibition was
held in the Rockhampton Art Gallery and has just closed, enabling me
to take photos of her dresses, bags, shoes etc. to show you what
I was totally in awe of when I first walked into the Art Gallery.





















There are many more photos, so I shall add them to my blog over the
next few weeks.

I feel Julie can be an inspiration to us all.
With a dressmaking background she has taken her stitching
in hand and machine embroidery
into a whole new creative world.

The avenues for Embellishing your garments are endless as
you will see in the photos I will be adding.

As an artist, your creativity is found in your use of fabric,
beads, fibres, lace and embroidery and  Colour with which
to obtain a unique artwork.

As Julie has said " An important moment was discovering the exciting
technique of free machine embroidery, which opened up a whole new
world of possibilities for her to create these unique gowns".





She has also used Silk Ribbon Embroidery in different features of these art works.
Check out the Posting Cinderella's Shoes.

In my tutorials I have been concentrating on the Basic Stitches and Flowers for the
time being, but there are so many applications for Silk Ribbon Embroidery. These
I hope to explore in the future.

Carol Daisy

Thursday, October 8, 2009

Silk Ribbon Embroidery - Crazy Patch / Quilting




















Silk Ribbon Embroidery can be applied to many styles of Craft,
one of which
is Crazy Patchwork.

Embellishing your Crazy Patch with SRE, adds another dimension
to your projects,
and gives such a wide variety of adornments.

Having a problem finding a trim, braid or a feature. Create your own.




Ribbons come in so many colours, widths and blends, that you are simply
able to create a flower or seam embellishment to fit your project.




Judith Baker Montano is a prominent embroiderer in this area, and has
shown in her work and publications, how beautiful it can be as an
embellishment.

I have only been into Crazy Patch for a short time.
May I say not because of the lack of interest, but for the shortage of
time at this stage. So I am just showing you a piece I have stitched
as a display to visitors at my stalls. At this stage I am not too sure what it will become in the future. I shall have to wait for the inspiration to flow.
The main reason that I have developed this blog is to encourage
a resurgence in Embroidery and I feel that Silk Ribbon is an excellent
way for the beginner to learn, owing to its fast application.

After all, aren't we all in the same situation of finding enough time for our
hobbies and crafts in this busy, hectic lifestyle we lead. So for so little
time spent, you can get such gorgeous results.

Carol Daisy

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Silk Ribbon Embroidery Tutorial - Jonquils














Jonquils - Narcissus Tazetta -
( tazetta an Italian word meaning small cup )
Jonquils blooms are in white, cream and yellow, and have a lingering perfume.

Silk Ribbon Embroidery Jonquils stay in bloom forever.

I have created these flowers in 4 mm. ribbon and as a
suggestion it is best that the ribbon being used has a
slight stiffness to it. This will help when forming the
petals.
When Embroidering such small flowers, it is just as important
to work the ribbon stitches around a centre as you would
with a wider ribbon.
The position the needle is brought up for each petal, will determine
the way each will form.
Also, slide the needle under the ribbon each time to flatten out
your ribbon as much as possible.





Step 1. Using 4 mm Green Ribbon
create the framework for your flowers. I have added the stems
by tightly twisting the ribbon and taking the needle through the
ribbon to hold it down. Add a few long Ribbon Stitch Leaves,
to approx. half way up the stems.








More leaves can be added when the flowers are completed,
if you feel it is needed to balance out the embroidery.




Step 2. The flowers consist of
6 petals, coming to a point at the tip.
(As shown previously, pull the ribbon away
from the hoop to make them pointed.)
The centres are one French Knot in yellow 4 mm ribbon.
Add a few buds with a single ribbon stitch, with green
thread back to the main flower.
Add some more leaves at this point if you wish.





Carol Daisy